dog wearing a harness

Why Use a Dog Harness? | Main Reasons to Buy a Dog Harness

dog wearing a harness

Why use a dog harness?

Did you aquire your first dog lately and you are pondering between buying a fancy collar or dog harness?

Or maybe you’ve owned dogs for years and just like I have, you’ve seen these people with different types of collars and harnesses and you’re wondering, should I get that? What are the benefits besides the looks?

In like manner, we proceeded to scatter the internet to gather as much data as possible for you. Also, we bought a few of them, we used them. You’ll see links to them throughout this article. 

So here are the five main reasons to use a dog harness or simply put: Why use a dog harness?

1. Dog harnesses are the most safe & secure way to hook a dog

As you know, dogs come in all sizes. Some of them are more vulnerable than others. Mostly small to very small dogs which tends to have more fragile bone structures. Some of them are more prone to injuries than others.

So to get to the point, we called all the dog trainers and veterinarians in our area, we spoke to pet shop owners and people working at the SPCA.

In reality, it is practically unanimous folks, the dog harness is simply the safest, most secure way to hook your dog. 

In fact, It is especially beneficial for breeds said as “shortened head” with a flat face such as Chow Chows,  Chihuahuas,  Pekingese, French Bulldogs Shih Tzus, Bulldogs or Pugs.

These type of dogs often suffers from respiratory issues which the harness helps reduce considerably.

2. Why use a dog harness? Less pull stress!

Furthermore, one of the main and most important reasons to use a dog harness is the immediate reduction in pull stress.

A body harness, for example, was initially designed for dogs who were going to be pulling heavy loads.

To clarify, It’s basically designed to distribute the weight and pressure from a leash all the way through your dog’s body, making it more comfortable for the dog to pull.

A good quality harness will essentially lower the center of gravity of your dog, give you more control and the result of that will be less pull stress for the dog and the human which will also reduce the chance of injury.

3. Greater variety of sizes and shapes of harnesses

Moreover, compared to say collars and other products, dog harnesses come in a variety of shapes and sizes to fit almost all types of dogs.

Namely, it also includes extra small and extra-large dogs which are often neglected by the main brands.

Between the front-clip harness and the full-body harness, it is relatively easy to find something both esthetically pleasing, comfortable for the dog, and most importantly, of the right size.

4. More control over your dog

If you own a big dog or if your dog is one of the strong ones, you know how control over your dog can be lost in a fraction of a second.

So this one is pretty straightforward. A dog harness will immediately give you more control over your dog, independently of its size. Why?

Because science! Haha

Basically, the dog harness will cover your dog’s chest, shoulders, and upper back.

In short, this dissipation or dispersion of pressure over a larger area will increase the overall control over your dog.

In general, more control also means the dog will tend to be more obedient. It should be easier for you to train, work on basic commands or even learn new ones.

Furthermore, the extra control provided by the dog harness will also be sensed by your dog and the result of that will be a calmer and more compliant beast.

5. Gets less tangled

Finally, we have all been thru the eternal untangling of the leash, especially the people using the very long ones.

If so, don’t underestimate this one because it was for our kind of a game-changer. With the dog harness, the leash gets way less tangled.

The reason behind that which I already stated before is the lower center of gravity resulting from your dog wearing the harness.

Concretely, the actual harness secures closer to the dog’s center of gravity which will also help prevent unsolicited jumping.

What Dog Harness Did We Buy?

As you know, we own a beautiful labrador and a small chihuahua. So we went for this model rabbitgoo which is available in 4 different sizes and about 20 different colors.

However, this is mainly desined for medium to large dogs. It has a list of recommended breeds which includes: Golden Retriever, Huskie, Labrador, Alaska, German Shepherd, Akita, etc.

The result, I must say, is quite impressive. You will see that we bought a more expensive one below and I’m not sure the dog knows or feel the difference. The most expensive one sure looks cooler and more durable though.

Since we were uncertain about the size and quality of the first dog harness, we decided to order the more expensive one to see the real difference between an amateur harness and a professional harness.

The one and only Julius-K9 IDC Powerharness for Dogs.

This one is the kind of harness used by K9 units and other stuff of that importance.

As mentioned before, it is incredibly well made and surely more durable than any other models I’ve come across. It also is from Juluis-K9, which is a reputable business in the industry.

However, for what it’s worth, our dog didn’t seem to enjoy more or less than the other model. And for the price difference, I wonder if this is really worth it for the daily walk around the park. You can judge by yourself.

This article would not have been possible without these sources:

PETA: https://www.peta.org/

WebMD: https://www.webmd.com/

Omlet: https://blog.omlet.co.uk

Safewise: https://www.safewise.com/

Whole dog journal: https://www.whole-dog-journal.com

Top10canada.ca is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon website. Amazon and the Amazon logo are trademarks of Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates
© Copyright Top 10 Canada - Powered by JMAGROUP
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5 Signs Dog Crate Is Too Small | Dog Crate Size Guide

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The main 5 signs that the dog crate is too small

Did you notice a change in your dog’s behavior lately? Are you worried that the dog crate or kennel you bought recently might be too small for him? Are there dead give away signs when a dog crate is too small?

Asking yourself these questions is perfectly justified. After all, the health and safety of our beloved pets are one of the most important things there is.

Little that you know, your dog might be trying to send you signals that his new crate is too small.

Is it even possible to identify these signs and make the proper corrections to make sure my dog doesn’t develop future health issues? Let’s explore the main 5 signs the dog crate is too small.

You can also click here to see the crate size choosing guide.

1. Your dog can’t sit up straight

To begin, the first test you should always do to measure if there are signs dog crate is too small is the sitting up straight test.

Have your dog sit up straight inside the kennel and make sure it is not hitting its head in anyway way.

The dog should have enough room inside so he doesn’t have to be cramping or hunching in any circumstances.

If you are somewhat tall and you had to hunch your back for a few hours inside a car or a small room, you know the feeling. Make sure the dog passes that test. 

Not too much room, just enough so it can sit as it would naturally.

2. Your dog can’t turn around easily

Similar to the first test, this one is as quick and as easy and will quickly determine if there are signs dog crate is too small. Very simple, take a piece of treat, have the dog turn around a couple of times inside the crate.

The dog should be able to turn easily on itself without any hunching and the only thing touching the crate should be maybe its tail a little bit.

This is extremely important not to ignore this sign as it will increase the risk of health issues over time.

If the dog can’t turn around freely without feeling uncomfortable, he will also have trouble laying down on its side, which is our #3 sign.

3. Your dog is not able to lay down on it’s side with its paw stretched out.

Just like most of us, your dog loves to lay down and stretch.

Heck, some of us would love to lay down and stretch all day if we could.

Why would you want to take that away from him? Another quick and easy test is to have your dog lay down on its side with its paw stretched out as much as possible.

Again the dog should be able to do this without any restraint and should not be touching the small fence too much.

That is assuming he is sitting in the middle of the crate of course. Having your dog stretch in front of you is the best way to be certain that the size of the crate isn’t too small.

However, if you are having a problem having the dog lay down in the middle of the crate ad stretch on command, I will allow you to use a measuring tape for good measures.

Just make sure to ass 2-3 inches to whatever number you came up with.

4. Your dog looks visibly uncomfortable

This one should be pretty straight forward.

However, we sometimes get accustomed to unusual behavior and we tend to ignore minor problems which can end up being big problems over time.

Maybe you will realize that you were ignoring some of the signs your dog has been sending you.

Here is a shortlist of signs that your dog is uncomfortable:

-Growling

Growling is basically the first sign that the dog feels either threatened or at least that someone is in their space. This will usually happen if someone other than the owner gets close to the crate as the dog feels vulnerable in this position. This is all fine and you shouldn’t really punish the dog for this behavior too much. If, however, the dog is growling while being alone without anyone near it, this could be a sign that the crate is too small.

 

-Barking

The act of barking can also mean a variety of different things but in the context of a crate being too small, a sign would be a sudden increase in the amount of barking. I am talking here about more of a stressed kind of bark and not a bark you would typically hear when a dog is about to bite for example.

-Whining

Whining is generally considered to be an automatic response when the animal feels stressed out.

In other words, the dog can’t really control itself and will be whining if its level of stress hits a certain amount.

A little bit of whining at the beginning or within the few seconds of you putting the animal inside the crate is fine.

Excessive whining would be considered a sign that the crate is too small.

 

-Shivering or freezing

If ever there was a sign you didn’t want to ignore, it’s this one.

Shivering or freezing excessively usually follows barking and whining.

Is it a sign that your dog’s body can’t handle the current stress levels and that they might become unpredictable.

If this behavior appeared after you bought it, it might be a sign that the dog crate is too small.

-Pacing

Pacing abundantly could be another sign that the crate you bought is a little small. Turning around to find the right spot and then lay down is perfectly fine. If it lasts more than a few minutes, it might reason for concern.

All of those could be very important signs dog crate is too small.

5. Rashes, neck & back problems, and other health issues

Maybe you just acquired or adopted a new dog.

You are not exactly sure how their previous owners were treating him.

Whenever an animal such as a dog is left in a dog crate that is too small for its body for a long period of time, it will eventually develop health issues such as rashes, neck problems, back problems, etc.

The risk of developing mental health issues increases considerably as well.

Here is a list of many different disorders related to dogs left for an extended period of time in crates that were too small:

  • Aggression
  • Withdrawal
  • Hyperactivity
  • Depression
  • Eating disorders
  • Obsessive licking
  • Separation anxiety
  • Inability to bond with humans
  • Muscle atrophy

If your dog or any dog experience symptoms related to this kind of disorders, make sure to take an appointment with your veterinarian as these serious issues can be related to many other factors.

What Dog Crate Do We Use?

Naturally, if you have been following us for a little while, you know we both a small chihuahua and a decent size labrador.

We currently own two different models. For the labrador, he is currently weighting around 50 lbs / 23 kg so we opted for an all in one kind of options. The crate comes with two dog bowls as well as pet bed. Here is an example below of how it looks. You can click to be taken to the amazon description.

However, the chihuahua is another story. It’s currently weighing around 14 lbs / 6.5 kg. I’ll put a link to the Amazon description and I’ll let you guess who bought this one.

Dog crate size by weight and breed

Crate Size Dog’s Weight Dog’s Breed
18″ x 18″ 0 – 24 lbs / 0 – 11 kg Chihuahua
18″ x 24″ 0 – 30 lbs / 0 – 14 kg Chihuahua, Pomeranian
24″ x 18″ 0 – 30 lbs / 0 – 14 kg Affenpinscher, Cairn Terrier, Havanese, Japanese Chin, Maltese, Norfolk Terrier, Pekingese, Pomeranian, Scottish Terrier, Shih Tzu, Skye Terrier, Silky Terrier, Toy Poodle, Toy Fox Terrier, West Highland White Terrier, Yorkshire Terrier
24″ x 24″ 0 – 38 lbs / 0 – 17 kg Affenpinscher, Cairn Terrier, Havanese, Japanese Chin, Maltese, Norfolk Terrier, Pekingese, Pomeranian, Scottish Terrier, Shih Tzu, Skye Terrier, Silky Terrier, Toy Poodle, Toy Fox Terrier, West Highland White Terrier, Yorkshire Terrier
24″ x 30″ 20 – 40 lbs / 14 – 18 kg Cocker Spaniel, Australian Terrier, Basset Hound, Bichon Frise, Boston Terrier, French Bulldog, Bull Terrier, Cardigan Welsh Corgi, Dachshund, Italian Greyhound, Jack Russell Terrier, Lhasa Apso, Poodle, Schnauzer, Parson Russell Terrier, Wirehaired Fox Terrier
24″ x 36″″ 20 – 40 lbs / 14 – 18 kg Cocker Spaniel, Australian Terrier, Basset Hound, Bichon Frise, Boston Terrier, French Bulldog, Bull Terrier, Cardigan Welsh Corgi, Dachshund, Italian Greyhound, Jack Russell Terrier, Lhasa Apso, Poodle, Schnauzer, Parson Russell Terrier, Wirehaired Fox Terrier
30″ x 24″ 0-40 lbs American Eskimo Dog, American Staffordshire Terrier, Basenji, Beagle, Brittany Spaniel, Chinese Sharpei, Chow Chow, German Pinscher, Irish Terrier, Keeshond, Kerry Blue Terrier
30″x30″ or 30″x36″ 40-50 lbs American Eskimo Dog, American Staffordshire Terrier, Basenji, Beagle, Brittany Spaniel, Chinese Sharpei, Chow Chow, German Pinscher, Irish Terrier, Keeshond, Kerry Blue Terrier
30″x30″ or 30″x36″ 50-60 lbs American Eskimo Dog, American Staffordshire Terrier, Basenji, Beagle, Brittany Spaniel, Chinese Sharpei, Chow Chow, German Pinscher, Irish Terrier, Keeshond, Kerry Blue Terrier
36″x24″ or 40-60 lbs American Pit Bull Terrier, Australian Cattle Dog, Border Collie, Bull Terrier, Dalmatian, Old English Sheepdog
36″x30″ or 36″x36″ 50-60 lbs American Pit Bull Terrier, Australian Cattle Dog, Border Collie, Bull Terrier, Dalmatian, Old English Sheepdog
36″x30″ or 36″x36″ 60-80 lbs American Pit Bull Terrier, Australian Cattle Dog, Border Collie, Bull Terrier, Dalmatian, Old English Sheepdog
42″x30″ or 42″x36″ 80-100 lbs Airedale Terrier, Alaskan Malamute, American Bulldog, Boxer, Briard, Malinois, Tervueren
42″x30″ or 42″x36″ 80-100 lbs Airedale Terrier, Alaskan Malamute, American Bulldog, Boxer, Briard, Malinois, Tervueren
  80-90 lbs Airedale Terrier, Alaskan Malamute, Boxer, Briard, Dalmatian, Malinois, Tervueren
48″x24″ or 48″x30″ 80-100 lbs Airedale Terrier, Alaskan Malamute, Boxer, Briard, Dalmatian, Malinois, Tervueren
  Up to 100 lbs Afghan, Akita, Bloodhound, Borzoi, Chinook, Doberman Pinscher, German Shepherd, Gordon Setter, Greyhound, Irish Setter, Leonberger, Neopolitan Mastiff, Newfoundland, Pointer, Rottweiler, Siberian Husky, Standard Poodle, Weimaraner
60″x36″ or 72″x36″ 100-150 lbs Akita, Anatolian Shepherd Dog, Bernese Mountain Dog, Bullmastiff, Great Dane, Great Pyrenees, Irish Wolfhound, Leonberger, Mastiff, Newfoundland, Scottish Deerhound, Siberian Husky
60″x36″ or 72″x36″ 150-180 lbs Akita, Anatolian Shepherd Dog, Bernese Mountain Dog, Bullmastiff, Great Dane, Great Pyrenees, Irish Wolfhound, Leonberger, Mastiff, Newfoundland, Scottish Deerhound, Siberian Husky

Crate Size by Weight

0 – 24 lbs / 0 – 11 kg 18″ x 18″
0 – 30 lbs / 0 – 14 kg 18″ x 24″
0 – 30 lbs / 0 – 14 kg 24″ x 18″
0 – 38 lbs / 0 – 17 kg 24″ x 24″
20 – 40 lbs / 14 – 18 kg 24″ x 30″
20 – 40 lbs / 14 – 18 kg 24″ x 36″″
0-40 lbs 30″ x 24″
40-50 lbs 30″x30″ or 30″x36″
50-60 lbs 30″x30″ or 30″x36″
40-60 lbs 36″x24″ or
50-60 lbs 36″x30″ or 36″x36″
60-80 lbs 36″x30″ or 36″x36″
80-100 lbs 42″x30″ or 42″x36″
80-100 lbs 42″x30″ or 42″x36″
80-90 lbs  
80-100 lbs 48″x24″ or 48″x30″
Up to 100 lbs  
100-150 lbs 60″x36″ or 72″x36″
150-180 lbs 60″x36″ or 72″x36″

Crate Size by Breed

18″ x 18″ Chihuahua
18″ x 24″ Chihuahua, Pomeranian
24″ x 18″

Affenpinscher, Cairn Terrier, Havanese, Japanese Chin, Maltese, Norfolk Terrier, Pekingese, Pomeranian, Scottish Terrier, Shih Tzu, Skye Terrier, Silky Terrier, Toy Poodle, Toy Fox Terrier, West Highland White Terrier, Yorkshire Terrier

24″ x 24″ Affenpinscher, Cairn Terrier, Havanese, Japanese Chin, Maltese, Norfolk Terrier, Pekingese, Pomeranian, Scottish Terrier, Shih Tzu, Skye Terrier, Silky Terrier, Toy Poodle, Toy Fox Terrier, West Highland White Terrier, Yorkshire Terrier
24″ x 30″ Cocker Spaniel, Australian Terrier, Basset Hound, Bichon Frise, Boston Terrier, French Bulldog, Bull Terrier, Cardigan Welsh Corgi, Dachshund, Italian Greyhound, Jack Russell Terrier, Lhasa Apso, Poodle, Schnauzer, Parson Russell Terrier, Wirehaired Fox Terrier
24″ x 36″″ Cocker Spaniel, Australian Terrier, Basset Hound, Bichon Frise, Boston Terrier, French Bulldog, Bull Terrier, Cardigan Welsh Corgi, Dachshund, Italian Greyhound, Jack Russell Terrier, Lhasa Apso, Poodle, Schnauzer, Parson Russell Terrier, Wirehaired Fox Terrier
30″ x 24″ American Eskimo Dog, American Staffordshire Terrier, Basenji, Beagle, Brittany Spaniel, Chinese Sharpei, Chow Chow, German Pinscher, Irish Terrier, Keeshond, Kerry Blue Terrier
30″x30″ or 30″x36″ American Eskimo Dog, American Staffordshire Terrier, Basenji, Beagle, Brittany Spaniel, Chinese Sharpei, Chow Chow, German Pinscher, Irish Terrier, Keeshond, Kerry Blue Terrier
30″x30″ or 30″x36″ American Eskimo Dog, American Staffordshire Terrier, Basenji, Beagle, Brittany Spaniel, Chinese Sharpei, Chow Chow, German Pinscher, Irish Terrier, Keeshond, Kerry Blue Terrier
36″x24″ or American Pit Bull Terrier, Australian Cattle Dog, Border Collie, Bull Terrier, Dalmatian, Old English Sheepdog
36″x30″ or 36″x36″ American Pit Bull Terrier, Australian Cattle Dog, Border Collie, Bull Terrier, Dalmatian, Old English Sheepdog
36″x30″ or 36″x36″ American Pit Bull Terrier, Australian Cattle Dog, Border Collie, Bull Terrier, Dalmatian, Old English Sheepdog
42″x30″ or 42″x36″ Airedale Terrier, Alaskan Malamute, American Bulldog, Boxer, Briard, Malinois, Tervueren
42″x30″ or 42″x36″ Airedale Terrier, Alaskan Malamute, American Bulldog, Boxer, Briard, Malinois, Tervueren
  Airedale Terrier, Alaskan Malamute, Boxer, Briard, Dalmatian, Malinois, Tervueren
48″x24″ or 48″x30″ Airedale Terrier, Alaskan Malamute, Boxer, Briard, Dalmatian, Malinois, Tervueren
  Afghan, Akita, Bloodhound, Borzoi, Chinook, Doberman Pinscher, German Shepherd, Gordon Setter, Greyhound, Irish Setter, Leonberger, Neopolitan Mastiff, Newfoundland, Pointer, Rottweiler, Siberian Husky, Standard Poodle, Weimaraner
60″x36″ or 72″x36″ Akita, Anatolian Shepherd Dog, Bernese Mountain Dog, Bullmastiff, Great Dane, Great Pyrenees, Irish Wolfhound, Leonberger, Mastiff, Newfoundland, Scottish Deerhound, Siberian Husky
60″x36″ or 72″x36″ Akita, Anatolian Shepherd Dog, Bernese Mountain Dog, Bullmastiff, Great Dane, Great Pyrenees, Irish Wolfhound, Leonberger, Mastiff, Newfoundland, Scottish Deerhound, Siberian Husky

 

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Are Dog Shock Collars Effective? Behavioral & Physiological Study

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"...there are still behavioral differences that are consistent with a more negative experience for dogs trained with e-collars, although there was no evidence of physiological disturbance."
Public Librairy of Science
2014

Are Dog Shock Collars Effective?

The use of dog shock collars to correct bad behavior has been present for a few decades now. But the real question is: Are dog shock collars effective?

Although the most recent studies show that positive reinforcement can be as good if not a better approach, proper training using a tool such as a dog shock collar can be extremely effective.

As a general feature, most dog shock collars will vibrate and generate a sound as a warning before an actual shock is delivered to the animal.

Consequently, this clever system will often be all it takes for the behavior to be corrected over time.

 

However, a study published in 2014 by the PLoS (Public library of Science) concluded that contrary to what collar manufacturers claim, the use of a shock collar as far as behavioral differences a more negative experience for dogs trained with e-collars, although there was no evidence of physiological disturbance.

How effective are dog shock collars ?

To begin, we have to define what exactly we mean by effective. If by effective you mean it’s going to stop the dog from barking, then yes it is very effective.

We’ll get into that in just a minute.

However, owner satisfaction isn’t the only factor to consider. We also have to consider the physiological aspect during and after training. After all, why make your dog go thru all of this if it’s only going to end up generating bigger problems in the future right? 

To properly measure its effectiveness, let’s see what the study had to say about it…

What science has to say about it:

Sample Population:

3 Groups, Group A B and C

The majority of dogs (51 dogs / 81%) had worrying or chasing as their owners’ primary concern. They were equally distributed amongst the three groups.

Nine dogs (14%) were chosen for general problems other than chasing and worrying.

Three dogs (5%) were referred to concerning aggressive behavior.

black and white husky looking at camera

Gravity of the problem

Thereafter, the owners were asked to rate the problems they had with their dog from 1 to 3. One is that the problem is always displayed, while three being that the problem is only displayed occasionally.

Here are the results:

-Always displayed: 31 dogs 49%

-Frequently displayed: 24 dogs 38%

-Occasionally displayed: 6 dogs 13%

Behavioral measures and observations

“There were no day effects on dog activity, panting, behavioral state, or tail carriage over the five training days.”

There were small differences between groups as far as the time they spent walking compared to the time they would spend sitting down for example.

The study also mentioned differences in “sniffing times” and environmental interactions between the group as well as a difference between the number of commands given.

Dogs in Groups A & B appeared to receive about twice as many commands per training session than their counterparts in Group C.

Group A did appear to be panting twice as much as the other group according to the study. However, this was not considered a significant effect.

“There was no evidence of a difference in the percentage of scans in the behavioral states relaxed, ambiguous, or excited between the three Groups.”

Physiological measures and observations

As far as training goes, the study showed that “Overall there were no consistent differences between sampling periods in salivary cortisol, and no evidence of interaction between sampling period and Group.”

Similarly,  there was no significant difference in urinary cortisol to creatinine ratios between groups before or after training.

There were also no changes in concentration ratios over the five days of training for any Group.

In other words, you can say there were no measurable effects related to collar settings on any physiological measures.

Owner Perception of Efficacy

In conclusion, the owners were largely satisfied with the training programs. They were asked questions such as:

How effective was the training method in improving the dog’s behavior? 

Were you satisfied with the training methods used with your dog? 

Will you continue to use the training methods for your dog’s referred behavior?

Here is what the results revealed: 

  • 88.5% of owners reported improvement in their dog’s general behavior
  • 91.8%  improvement in the obedience problem
  • There were no significant differences between the responses from the other owners from each group.
  • 90.2% of the owners were satisfied with the training advice they received along the way
  • 88.5% indicated that they would keep using the trainer’s advice from now on 

 There was no evidence of differences between the three training Groups in these measures of satisfaction.

Furthermore, the study mentioned that a high percentage of the owners were confident that they could continue to apply the training techniques.

Additionally, there the results were insignificant in proving that the owners who experienced dog shock collar training were less confident in applying the training approaches seen.

Conclusions

The data is pretty clear, “there was no evidence of physiological disturbance.” 

However, it has been shown that the effects of training with an e-collar give rise to behavioral signs of distress in pet dogs, especially when used at high settings.

Furthermore, even though dog shock collar manufacturers tend to take the behavioral and physiological indicators less seriously, the study shows signs which are more consistent with a negative experience for dogs training with the dog shock collar compared to the ones trained without it.

That’s taking into consideration the fact that there was no hard evidence of physiological disturbances.

Unfortunately, even though the owners were largely happy with the results, the dog shock collar training did not result in a substantially superior response to training in comparison to similarly experienced trainers using other methods.

They went as far as saying that chances to affect the well being of your pet dog is at risk when using such a device by the best practices suggested by the manufacturers. 

The risks are expected to increase in cases where the owners would not use the dog shock collar properly.

My opinion and two product suggestions

Firstly, I have to say that I learned a lot by doing the research for this article.

In the end, it all comes down to personal choices.

To be perfectly honest, I have used these kinds of devices many times in the past and still use them.

I find that if used at the lower settings with the vibration and beeping warning on, the negative effects are reduced considerably.

Above are the two models we have been using with both our Labrador and our Chihuahua. 

We had the chance to test quite a few models in the past year so when I say they are the best, you can take my word for it.

We used it mainly to prevent barking and chasing. The first one is from Petrainer and the second one is from SportDOG.

If you wan’t to check out the specifications, you can click on the pictures to be taken to the Amazon description.

Both models come with key features such as:

-Beeping and vibration warning

-Rechargeable collar

-Multiple training modes

-Rainproof / Waterproof

-Long Range Remote

You might also want to check out our Top 10 Waterproof Dog Shock Collar With Remote by clicking here.

I took price into consideration when making the Top 10 so you will find cheaper options over there.

This article would not have been possible without these sources:

PLoS: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4153538/

WebMD: https://www.webmd.com/

 

Top10canada.ca is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon website. Amazon and the Amazon logo are trademarks of Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates
© Copyright Top 10 Canada - Powered by JMAGROUP
dog wearing orange glasses sitting on a motorcycle

Can I Take My Dog On A Motorcycle? Dog Carrier and BackPack

dog wearing orange glasses sitting on a motorcycle

” It is permitted to take your dog on a motorcycle ride in almost every US state as well as in every single province of Canada.

However,  you should always double-check with the local authorities to make sure you are following the appropriate safety measures and that you are not breaking the law. “

Is it permitted to take my dog on a motorcycle?

Maybe you just watched a youtube video, saw a picture, or just had this genius idea to take a ride with your dog on your motorcycle.

Helmet on, keys in the ignition, doggy looking at you confused. You pause for one second and you ask yourself: ”Is this thing even legal”?

The answer is yes, and no. It is permitted to take your dog on a motorcycle ride in almost every US state as well as in every single province of Canada. 

However, you should always double-check with the local authorities to make sure you are following the appropriate safety measures and to make sure you are not breaking the law.

Be sure to check out our Top 10 Motorcycle Dog Carrier by clicking here.

 

small dog on a blue scooter

Not the best answer, but bear with me for a second…

I know that’s probably not the answer you were hoping to get.

The reality is, with all the laws and policies constantly evolving, It would be impossible to keep a record of it all.

That said, there are a few key things you have to keep in mind before even thinking about going for a ride with your pet…

Safety tips and best practices to safely take your dog on a motorcycle.

Firstly, animals are not permitted to be carried on a motorbike between a rider and the handlebars, or in any other position that would interfere with the rider’s ability to control the motorbike.

This law is valid for almost every single state and province we looked at. Some guy even wrote on the whirlpool forum that he was stopped by the police. The Penalty: 3 demerit points (4 in a school zone) and $397 ($496 in a school zone)

Fun fact, this is also true when driving a car. Not sure if the ticket is the same amount though.

Secondly, the dog, or any animal you plan to carry, should be attached and secured either to the motorcycle or to yourself.

It can’t be sitting in a bag or loose in a plastic milk crate like in this picture:

small dog sitting on a motorcycle

I know It’s funny and cute… But seriously, don’t do that guys. It’s unsafe for both you and your animal. Not to mention it’s most certainly illegal.

Depending on the size of your dog, you can go for either a dog pet carrier backpack, similar to the ones used by hikers and travelers. The ones you can hold on your shoulder. Obviously, those are for small to medium dogs.

To give you an idea, here’s an example from one of amazon’s best sellers. This is the cheaper model:

black dog backpack
amazon button

Some of us like to try the higher end of the market as well and there’s no shame in that. At around 70$, here’s an example of a higher quality backpack with more pockets and features:

guy with blue shirt holding dog in a backpack

amazon button

You know me, I tend to abuse amazon’s return policy a little bit. I did order both of these backpacks. To be honest, they both do the job.

Remember the whole point here is to buy a sturdy dog backpack carrier that isn’t facing to the front. As long as the backpack is sitting on your BACK (duh), and the dog is strapped and can’t jump out at will, you should be alright.

white dog next to a black motorcycle

Options for bigger dogs and for longer rides.

I mean, they have huge backpacks that can fit bigger dogs. But let’s be real here, who wants to carry an 85-pound dog on their back across the city. Just thinking about it gives me back pain.

Following the principle that your dog should always be secured, you could decide to go for more kind of a crate carrier, similar to what people who travel a lot with their dogs use.

They are a bit more expensive than a simple backpack. However, they usually come with a variety of tools and features such as a place for the drinking bowl, a bottle of water, etc.

Again, there’s nothing like an image to show you what I’m talking about. Here is the high-end portable weather-resistant dog/cat carrier crate:


More crazy ideas to fulfill your need to take your pet on a motorbike ride.

If you are a hardcore dog lover and you feel like taking this thing to the next level, there are even more expensive and eye-catching options out there.

The most badass thing I’ve seen personally was the dog sidecar.

girl sitting with her dog in a sidecar

This is what I call living your lives to the fullest. Careful, the rules mentioned before still applies. The dog has to be secured by a seatbelt and preferably secured with a leash to the car. The same rule would apply when carrying your dog in a pickup.

man with his dog on a motorcycle and sidecar

5 Steps to take before going on your first ride.

Ok, I’m assuming you went on a shopping spray and whatever options you picked, it’s coming in 1-day shipping. Time to prepare your dog for its first official ride.

If you have no idea what I just said, please join us in the 21st century and get a free amazon trial prime account right this second by clicking here. You can always unsubscribe after the purchase for absolutely no fee. 

Back to preparing your dog. You are probably pumped and eager to try to ride with your best friend for the first time. Let’s make sure your dog is ready too so he can enjoy the ride as much as you do.

Step 1

Get the dog comfortable around a running motorcycle. 

This step will be easy for some and a pain in the butt for others. I found that it is easier to start the motorcycle while the dog isn’t in the garage or outside yet. That way it doesn’t get startled and it’s easier to get it to calm down and relax.

Once it’s comfortable around a running motorcycle, try turning the bike off and on again a few times around it until basically, the dog could not care less about it.

Make sure to always pet and give treats when the dog complies.

Step 2

Get the dog comfortable sitting on a motorcycle.

While the motorcycle is not running, take the dog in your arms and sit on the bike for a min. If you bought a carrier, place it inside the carrier and let it sit there for a min.

Once a minute or two has passed, place the dog back on the ground.

Repeat this step a few times or until the dog is giving little to no resistance.

Don’t forget those praise and treats for positive reinforcement.

Step 3

Get your dog windproof eye protection.

Technically, you don’t absolutely need to get your dog eye protection. However, it’s a good idea to make such a purchase for multiple obvious reasons. Dog safety, improved happiness, and looking like a badass come to mind to name a few.

Here’s a link to the one we currently use which is available at around 20$ on amazon:

black eye protection for dog

amazon button

If you want to go berserk and buy the high-end eye protection on the market, you should definitely check out Rex Specs’s website. Their offer is more expensive but it’s geared towards active dogs.

Step 4

Take your dog for a small ride.

The weather is perfect, the dog is accustomed and familiarized with the routine. It’s time to take it for a small ride.

Don’t get ahead of yourself here, the dog could have all kinds of reaction. You don’t want to traumatize the beast on your first ride now do you?

The first 5-10 rides should be short and at low to very low speed. If you have a good relation with your pet, chances are you’ll know when too fast or too long a ride for the animal.

Make sure you bring water and treats. If you have time, make a stop at a place you know the dog will enjoy. This will reinforce positive behavior. Next time you take off for a ride, good feelings will start rushing in and he’ll be excited to join you.

Step 5

Final step!

The final step is easy, take badass (or cute) pictures and email us so we can post them here and on our Facebook page. Who knows, your dog might become famous! 

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dog and owner looking at the sunset

Can I safely feed Kraft peanut butter to my dog?

"We asked Kraft directly and here is what they answered:  Kraft Peanut Butter is considered safe for dogs and does not contain Xylitol.  It goes for the creamy and the crunchy kind as well. You can safely feed Kraft peanut butter to your dog."

Can I safely feed Kraft peanut butter to my dog?

If you read our other article on Jif’s peanut butter, you probably know by now that veterinarians are okay with giving Kraft peanut butter to your dog.

In fact, most professionals and dog experts we asked confessed right away when we asked them if they ever fed their dog Kraft peanut butter. 

One veterinarian we spoke with did mention that he prefers recommending brands like Poochie Peanut Butter. According to him, they are making a better job of keeping all the ingredients natural.

That said, Kraft Peanut Butter is way more accessible and is doing a pretty good job in that regard. It is still considered one of the safest options you can opt for and let’s face it, one of the most affordable on the market. 

In short, no it doesn’t contain Xylitol.

 

What exactly is Xylitol and does Kraft Peanut Butter contains any?

 
 
Let me just clear the air, Kraft Peanut Butter does not contain Xylitol and they confirmed many times that it’s not an ingredient in any of their Kraft Peanut butter products.

For some, knowing that it’s not present in the product is enough. For the others, here is what Wikipedia had to say about Xylitol:

In dogs, Xylitol (in amounts greater than 100 mg per kilogram of body weight) generates a rapid, dose-dependent insulin release that can result in hypoglycemia, which can be life-threatening.

Low blood sugar can result in a loss of coordination, depression, collapse, and seizures in dogs as quickly as 30 minutes following ingestion.

 Intake of doses of Xylitol greater than 500 to 1000 mg per kilogram body weight has been implicated in potentially fatal liver failure in dogs.

Xylitol is used in comparatively much smaller doses, in the ingredients of two commercial veterinary drinking water additives, marketed to prevent plaque and freshen the breath of pets.

 

Better safe than sorry.

Reading about the side effects isn’t reassuring at all, I agree. But it is no time to panic. 

The sweetener is harmless to humans but after reading all about it, I don’t want any of it in my house right?

 I tend to agree with that. The first thing that comes to mind: I will look at the ingredients. But what if they don’t show it in their ingredients? Impossible.

 Since 2016, it is illegal not to disclaim Xylitol as an ingredient on the packaged product. If it’s not there, it’s not in the product. 

Even if Kraft told us all their products are Xylitol free, we checked pretty much all of them and couldn’t find anything. It’s conclusive:

 

Ok, Kraft doesn’t use Xylitol in their peanut butter, fine. Is there a peanut butter company I should avoid at all costs when it comes to feeding it to my doggy?

 

Here are the peanut butter brands and companies which include Xylitol in their products.

 

It’s important to mention that these companies and brands aren’t evil. Their products are perfectly fine for humans. Avoid feeding it to your dogs.

No Cow (Formerly D’s Naturals)

Go Nuts, Co.

Krush Nutrition

Nuts ‘N More

P28 Foods

Please note Hank’s Protein Plus brand is now safe as they removed Xylitol from their products.

 

 

What is considered a safe amount of Kraft Peanut Butter to feed my dog?

 

Before deciding the proper amount of peanut butter you should feed your dog, it’s important to know that peanut butter is a great source of protein and fat. However, too much of a good thing can also be bad. 

Generally, veterinarians and dog experts agree in saying that 1/2 a spoon up to a spoon a day is perfectly fine. 

This is a general amount and of course, it can vary based on your dog size.

There are various ways to physically feed it to the dog but we find that stuffing toys and treat dispensers with it is both effective and will stimulate the dog’s cognitive abilities.

 You are probably familiar with the Kong Extreme original toy but if you are interested in testing other similar toys you can stuff with peanut butter and other treats, my wife and I went thru the process of buying and testing all the toys we could find on amazon and we created a small Top 10 of toys you can stuff with peanut butter. 

Here is a link to check it out.

Kuoser Cozy WaterProof Reversible Dog Coat

Other safety issues to consider when feeding Kraft Peanut Butter to a dog.

 

There are a few other safety issues and tips you should consider before giving any peanut butter brand to your animal. You probably guessed it, I am talking here about allergies.

Symptoms of allergic reactions to peanut butter in dogs.

 

Here is a list of the potential symptoms you should look for when giving your dog peanut butter.

Symptoms of peanut allergy in dogs can include:

  • Skin irritation (redness and itchy skin)
  • Bald Spots
  • Hair Loss
  • Gastric Distress
  • Difficulty breathing (On rare occasion)
  • Hot spots
  • Excessive licking of the skin
  • Agitation and nervous excitement

 

 

You can test allergies in dogs. Here are the 2 ways to do so.

 

You probably guessed it, the safest way to determine if your dog is allergic to peanut butter is a thorough exam by your veterinarian.

It may seem like a hassle and a bit of an overkill for something as trivial as giving some peanut butter to a dog but you can never be too careful.

Meanwhile, you can ask your veterinarian to test for other food allergies, including different types of proteins. While being there, you can also have him test for flea allergies, contact allergies including many kinds of grass, plants, dust mites, and molds.

There are other tests for allergens that are less common in dogs but are available if recommended by your veterinarian or if you feel like it’s necessary.

The two main types of dog allergy testing are blood tests and intradermal skin testing.

 
 
 

 

How much do these kinds of tests cost?

 
The cost of testing for allergies varies on what you want to be tested for and what method you are going to use. We called 20 different places and asked our 12 experts for references.
Conclusion: the pricing is all over the place. There’s no way to tell if one is better than the other without either speaking with people who actually went thru the procedure or testing it ourselves. 


That being said, you can expect to pay between 50$ to 300$ for a skin allergy test and between $220 to $1000 for a blood test.
 

Is it accurate?

Almost all of them told us it was the only accurate way to make sure your animal isn’t allergic to anything.

However, most blogs and websites we found online seems to claim otherwise. We did speak with a couple of friends who went thru the whole thing and they seemed quite pleased with the results.

The veterinarian was able to diagnose a food allergy and gave them a bunch of tricks and a homemade recipe to prevent future outbreaks.

At your own risk

 

You can always do what we did which is giving an extremely small amount at the time for a few days and watch for reactions.

It does seem like playing with fire a little bit but when I told my veterinarian what I did, he laughed and called me a skinflint.

Of course, he did recommend to have our dogs tested anyway to make sure nothing else would pop-up, which we politely declined.

He also mentioned that this method is at your own risk but as long as you live at less than 10 minutes from a veterinarian, you are probably fine.

 

 

 

Is Kraft Creamy Peanut Butter safer than the Crunchy one?

 

To our knowledge, none is considered safer than the other. They both are considered safe. What else do you want from us? hehe.

We already established that none of the Kraft peanut butter products contains Xylitol. Both are perfectly fine.

It all comes down to personal preference and the ratio of fat to protein which is extremely comparable. I’ve read online on other blogs that the crunchy one could cause harm to small dogs but my small Chihuahua begs to differ.

Go with the Creamy one if it’s an issue for you but I really don’t think this is going to be a problem for any size dog.

In case you didn’t already know, you can buy it in bulk from Kraft on their Amazon store.

Click here to check it out.

 

What are the best dog toys to stuff with Kraft Peanut Butter?

 

Just like everything we do, we spent way too much time buying and testing all the treat-dispensing toys available out there.

As I mentioned before, evidently, The Kong original is always a no-brainer, but there’s a lot of other really nice toys you can put peanut (and other treats) in. You can check out our Top 10 Toys you can stuff with peanut butter by clicking

 

In conclusion

 

For those like me who always skip to the end, here is what you want to take away from this:

1. Kraft Peanut Butter is safe for your dog and does not contain Xylitol, a sweetener potentially deadly to dogs.

2. Do not feed anything which contains Xylitol to your dog or any animal for that matter or it might kill it.

3. Make sure your dog isn’t allergic to peanuts before feeding him half a spoon a day.

4. Check out our Top 10 toys you can stuff with peanut butter by clicking here.

 

Kraft Smooth Peanut Butter Ingredients

 

Here is all the information provided by Kraft concerning their creamy peanut butter. Obviously, when looking for a reliable source, nothing beats the official website. You can click here to be taken to the official website’s ingredients and nutritional facts & information section.

 

KRAFT Smooth Peanut Butter

 

KRAFT Smooth Peanut Butter

 

Nutrition

 

Nutritional Information

Serving Size Per 1 Tbsp. (15 g)
AMOUNT PER SERVING
Calories  90 cal
% Daily Value
Total Fat  8 g12%
Saturated Fat  1.5 g8%
+ Trans  0 g
Cholesterol  0 mg 
Sodium  60 mg3%
Carbohydrates  4 g1%
Fiber 1 g4%
Sugars  1 g
Protein  3 g
  
Vitamin A0%
Vitamin C0%
Calcium0%
Iron2%

* Nutrition information is estimated based on the ingredients and cooking instructions as described in each recipe and is intended to be used for informational purposes only. 

Please note that nutrition details may vary based on methods of preparation, origin, and freshness of ingredients used.

 

Allergens

  • Peanut

 

Ingredients

INGREDIENTS: SELECT ROASTED PEANUTS, SOYBEAN OIL, CORN MALTODEXTRIN, SUGAR, HYDROGENATED VEGETABLE OIL (COTTONSEED AND RAPESEED OIL), SALT, MONO- AND DIGLYCERIDES. (1004L)

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Is Jif Peanut Butter Safe For Dogs? | Ingredients & Warnings

"We can confirm that Xylitol is not an ingredient in any of our Jif® peanut butter products. We appreciate you reaching out!"
Jif® Peanut Butter @Jif · Sep 5, 2016
Twitter

Is Jif Peanut Butter Safe For Dogs and Puppies?

Besides homemade peanut butter, most dog trainers and veterinarians agree in saying that Jif Peanut Butter actually is one of the safest options you can choose to feed as treats for your dogs.

In fact, only one professional out of the twelve we questioned told us that he never used Jif as treat for his dogs.

Not that he didn’t recommend it, he just never tried it.

However, 8 out of the twelve did mention that Kraft Peanut Butter and Skippy Peanut Butter are also considered equally safe and that people shouldn’t worry much about feeding any of these 3 options to their dogs.

5 of them also mentioned Peter Pan Peanut Butter as being an equivalent option to the ones mentioned before.

For what it’s worth, both our Labradors and Chihuahua have been getting half a tablespoon or so of the creamy Jif every morning for the past 4 years.

No problems thus far, not a single side effect either.

What is Xylitol and does Jif Peanut Butter contains any?

First of all, I’m happy to tell you that Jif Peanut Butter confirmed on Twitter in 2016 that Xylitol is not an ingredient in any of their Jif Peanut butter products.

Wanna know about Xylitol anyway? Here is what Wikipedia has to say about Xylitol and the potential effects on dogs:

In dogs, Xylitol (in amounts greater than 100 mg per kilogram of body weight) generates a rapid, dose-dependent insulin release that can result in hypoglycemia, which can be life-threatening.

Low blood sugar can result in a loss of coordination, depression, collapse, and seizures in dogs as quickly as 30 minutes following ingestion.

Intake of doses of Xylitol greater than 500 to 1000 mg per kilogram body weight has been implicated in potentially fatal liver failure in dogs.

Xylitol is used in comparatively much smaller doses, in the ingredients of two commercial veterinary drinking water additives, marketed to prevent plaque and freshen the breath of pets.

But wait…

Is now the right time to panic?

Of course not.

I have to agree, after reading everything we could find about Xylitol, I was kind of freaking out myself.

I know it’s a strange statement coming from someone who is giving half a spoon to both our dogs every single morning for the past four years or so.

This sweetener is harmless to humans but can be potentially deadly when ingested by dogs.

I later found out that firstly, it is illegal for a company to use Xylitol without listing it in their ingredients.

 

And most importantly, I was relieved to learn that Jif Peanut Butter does not contain Xylitol in any of their products.

Peanut butter brands and companies include Xylitol in their products.

Here are the ones you should avoid feeding your dogs. However perfectly fine for you humans.

What is a safe amount of Jif Peanut Butter to feed my dog?

Again, most veterinarians and other dog professionals agree in saying that 1/2 a spoon up to a spoon a day is perfectly fine according to your dog’s size.

It may seem like a small amount for the big dog owners out there but considering that peanut butter is quite rich in fat and proteins, it is actually a decent intake of nutrients for a single treat.

There are a lot of toys and treat dispensers out there you can buy to make sure your dog works a little bit to get to the treat and at the same time develop its cognitive abilities.

You are probably familiar with the Kong Extreme original toy but if you are interested in other similar toys you can stuff with peanut butter and other treats, my wife and I are obsessed with testing all the toys we can find and over time we came up with a Top 10 toys you can stuff with peanut butter. Here is a link to check it

Other safety issues to consider when feeding Jif Peanut Butter to a dog

Now that you went thru every single ingredient on your Jif Peanut Butter and couldn’t find Xylitol, you are wondering if there is any other safety issue to consider before giving your animal some Jif Peanut Butter.

There is actually one more thing to make sure of before feeding Jif’s peanut butter or any peanut butter for that matter to an animal. We are talking about allergies. Yes, unfortunately, just like humans, dogs can be allergic to Peanut Butter.

Symptoms of allergic reactions to peanut butter in dogs.

Here is a list of the potential symptoms you should look for when giving your dog peanut butter.

Symptoms of peanut allergy in dogs can include:

  • Skin irritation (redness and itchy skin)
  • Hot spots
  • Excessive licking of the skin
  • Agitation and nervous excitement
  • Bald Spots
  • Hair Loss
  • Gastric Distress
  • Difficulty breathing (On rare occasion)

2 ways to test for allergies in dogs

black dog

You guessed it, the first and safest way to determine if your dog is allergic to peanut butter is a thorough exam by your veterinarian.

It may seem like a hassle and a bit of an overkill for something as trivial as giving some peanut butter to a dog but you can never be too careful. Meanwhile, you can ask your veterinarian to test for other food allergies, including different types of proteins.

While being there, you can also have him test for flea allergies, contact allergies including many kinds of grass, plants, dust mites, and molds. There are other tests for allergens that are less common in dogs but are available if recommended by your veterinarian or if you feel like it’s necessary. The two main types of dog allergy testing are blood tests and intradermal skin testing.

How much does it cost?

The cost of testing for allergies varies on what you want to be tested for and what method you are going to use. We called 20 different places and asked our 12 experts for references. Conclusion: the pricing is all over the place.
 
There’s no way to tell if one is better than the other without either speaking with people who actually went thru the procedure or testing it ourselves. That being said, you can expect to pay between 50$ to 300$ for a skin allergy test and between $220 to $1000 for a blood test.

Is it accurate?

Almost all of them told us it was the only accurate way to make sure your animal isn’t allergic to anything. However, most blogs and websites we found online seems to claim otherwise.

We did speak with a couple of friends who went thru the whole thing and they seemed quite pleased with the results.

The veterinarian was able to diagnose a food allergy and gave them a bunch of tricks and a homemade recipe to prevent future outbreaks.

At your own risk

 

 
The second option is at your own risk and peril. You can always do what we did which is giving an extremely small amount at the time for a few days and watch for reactions. It does seem like playing with fire a little bit but when I told my veterinarian what I did, he laughed and called me a skinflint.
 

Of course, he did recommend to have our dogs tested anyway to make sure nothing else would pop-up, which we politely declined.

He also mentioned that this method is at your own risk but as long as you live at less than 10 minutes from a veterinarian, you are probably fine.

Is Jif Creamy Peanut Butter safer than the Crunchy one?

 

Now you are just speaking nonsense. We already established that none of the Jif peanut butter products contains Xylitol. Both are perfectly fine.

It all comes down to personal preference and the ratio of fat to protein which is extremely comparable.

I’ve read online on other blogs that the crunchy one could cause harm to small dogs but my small Chihuahua begs to differ.

Go with the Creamy one if it’s an issue for you but I really don’t think this is going to be a problem for any size dog. In case you didn’t already know, you can buy it in bulk from Jif on their Amazon store. Click here to check it out.

What are the best toys I can stuff with Jif peanut butter?

 

We spent way too much time buying and testing all the treat-dispensing toys available out there. As I mentioned before, evidently, The Kong original is always a no-brainer, but there’s a lot of other really nice toys you can put peanut (and other treats) in.

You can check out our Top 10 Toys you can stuff with peanut butter by clicking here.

 

In conclusion

 

The important part to remember is:

1. Jif peanut butter is safe for your dog and does not contain Xylitol.

2. Do not feed any food which contains Xylitol to your dog or it might injure or even worse kill it.

3. Make sure your dog isn’t allergic to peanuts before feeding him half a spoon a day.

4. Check out our Top 10 dog toys you can stuff with peanut butter by clicking here.

Jif Creamy Peanut Butter Ingredients

 

Here is all the information provided by Jif concerning their creamy peanut butter. Obviously, when looking for a reliable source, nothing beats the official website. You can click here to be taken to the official website’s ingredients and nutritional facts and information.
 

Jif® Creamy Peanut Butter

Per 1 Tbsp (17 g)
Calories 100
 AMOUNT% DAILY VALUE
Fat8 g13%
     Saturated1.5 g7%
     + Trans0 g 
Cholesterol0 mg 
Sodium70 mg3%
Carbohydrate4 g1%
     Fibre1 g5%
     Sugars2 g 
Protein4 g 
Vitamin A 0%
Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 0%
Iron 2%
Top10canada.ca is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon website. Amazon and the Amazon logo are trademarks of Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates
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